Viking Drinking Horns 

Ref. 50462

24,50 €
Available: Immediate Delivery

Viking drinking horn made of real horn with a capacity of about 0.5 liters, Support not included

Ref. 52147

12,50 €
Available: Immediate Delivery

Soporte de cuero para llevar cuernos de beber en el cinturón.

Ref. 50460

12,26 €
Available: Immediate Shipment

Wrought iron support for small drinking horn. For horns with an approximate capacity of 0,2 and 0,3 litres.

Ref. 50464

27,09 €
Available: Immediate Delivery

Drinking horn with a capacity of approximately 0.75 litres, No incluye soporte.

Ref. 50466

5,45 €
Available: Immediate Shipment

This simple and low-priced drinking horn holder is made of two riveted leather straps.

Ref. 4251-LOR

19,99 €
Available: Immediate Delivery

This powder horn is made from genuine cattle horn and reconstructed following original findings.  The horn is notched decoratively and has a wooden cap, fastened with authentic nails from brass. The opening at the horn’s point can be closed  by a stopper. 

Ref. 50458

12,26 €
Available: Immediate Shipment

This stand for drinking horns is made of black painted steel. Small size for horns from 0,2 to 0,4 liters.

Ref. 4435-LOR

33,26 €
Available: Immediate Delivery

Jug made of natural horn, with high resistance handle. Each jar is different since it is a natural product. Height 17 cm.

Ref. 6902-LOR

53,43 €
Available: Immediate Delivery

Handmade jug made of leather with hand-stitched cowhide. Inner coated hardened beeswax. Height 16 cm Recommendations Do not expose it to the sun for a long time and should not be used with high-alcohol drinks as the interior could be damaged.

Ref. 50461

13,48 €
Shipping in 20 working days

Hand-made wrought iron drinking horn support. For horns with an approximate capacity of 0,3 to 0,7 litres.

Ref. 6521BK-LOR

7,48 €
Shipping in 4-6 weeks

Leather holder to carry drinking horns on the belt.

Ref. 50463

25,71 €
Shipping in 20 working days

Viking drinking horn of approximately 0,9 liters capacity, Supporto non incluso

Ref. 50824

10,21 €
Shipping in 20 working days

Drinking horn made of real horn. Polished exterior. Capacity: 100 ml-199 ml aprox.

Ref. 50459

12,26 €
Shipping in 20 working days

This stand for drinking horns is made of black painted steel for large drinking horns, 0.5 to 1.0 liters.

Ref. 50465

11,71 €
Shipping in 20 working days

Drinking horn made of real horn. Polished outside. Varnished inside with food-safe varnish (will resist alcohol), Support not included.

Showing 1 - 15 of 15 items

Horns to drink with or without stand.

The Viking horn to drink is just what it seems: bovine antlers used as a container for liquids. The horns are known since classical antiquity, especially in the Balkans, and have remained in use for ceremonial purposes during the Middle Ages and the beginnings of modernity in Germanic Europe. Horns are now used to toast on special occasions in countries like Georgia.

Some notable examples of the horns of Europe of the Middle Ages were made with the horns of bison or European uro (species of extinct bull in the seventeenth century). Most of the horns of the Viking era were domestic, smaller cattle. The exception to the norm are the large uro horns found in the tomb of Sutton Hoo (Suffolk, east coast of England).

VIKING HORN FOR TRADITIONAL DRINKING
Numerous elaborate horns have been found to drink in tombs of pagan Germanic tribes. The findings span a millennium, from the Germanic Iron Age, to the Viking Age.

Hardly have we got horns of the Viking Age. Both the cattle and the goats were everyday objects prone to deterioration. The decorative metallic pieces and frames for horns recovered in the deposits, testify that their use was very extended, in spite of the fact that the preserved natural horns are scarce.

The majority of the Norwegian horns that are conserved, dated in Average Age, have ornamented metal frames, although the horns are smooth and without adornments. There are also some horns with incrustations in the same horns, although from a later period; its simplicity testifies that it is popular craftsmanship.

HORN VIKING IN THE ART
The Bayeux tapestry (circa 1070) shows the scene of a banquet before Harold Godwinson embarks for Normandy. Several figures are given a tribute with horns to drink in a building.

The horns to drink appear in multiple literary works of the Viking Age:

In the Edda, Thor drank from a horn that, without knowing it, contained all the seas. By drinking much of the sea content, Thor frightened Utgard-Loki (king of the giants: not to be confused with the god Loki) and his relatives.
The hero Beowulf drank mead on carved horns, and is also used for drinking in the epic poem of the year 1000 Gudrunarkvida II.